VCCS Chancellor visits NRCC for Town Hall Meeting

0011From NRCC

Over 60 business and industry professionals attended a Town Hall meeting with Virginia’s Community Colleges Chancellor Glenn DuBois Tuesday in Christiansburg. Sponsored by New River Community College, the town hall setting gave area leaders an opportunity to address some key strengths needed in today’s workforce.  Representatives from each of the college’s jurisdiction – Floyd, Giles, Montgomery and Pulaski Counties and the City of Radford – attended the session.  Tuesday’s meeting was one of 17 town hall sessions to be held across the Commonwealth for the Chancellor and respective colleges to learn more about the credentialed workforce needs in the communities served by Virginia’s community colleges.

One of county’s sports greats, Charlie Sumner, dies at 84

Oakland Raiders defensive coordinator Charlie Sumner (center) gives instructions to Ted Hendricks as head coach Tom Flores looks on. (Virginia Sports Hall of Fame photo)

Oakland Raiders defensive coordinator Charlie Sumner (center) gives instructions to Ted Hendricks as head coach Tom Flores looks on.
(Virginia Sports Hall of Fame photo)

By MIKE WILLIAMS

Publisher

Pulaski County lost one of its all-time greats in sports on April 3 when Charles Edward “Charlie” Sumner, 84 passed away at his Maui County, Hawaii home.

Charlie Sumner

Charlie Sumner

Sumner, a Dublin native, died from complications following gall bladder surgery.

Sumner was born in Radford on Oct. 19, 1930 and was raised in the Highland section of Pulaski County. He was a 1950 graduate of Dublin High School and attended the College of William & Mary.

He was a standout football player at both Dublin and W&M.

According to information supplied by Sharon Vickers Hardy of Pulaski, a family member, Sumner scored “at least one touchdown in nearly every game he played” for the Dukes while in high school.

Dublin’s Bill Thomas, who spearheaded an effort in 2007 to have Sumner named to the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame, noted Sumner was a four-year starter at Dublin, playing quarterback, running back and defensive back for the Dukes.

He was named to the both the All-County and All-District teams and all four years the Dukes had winning seasons – including going 7-2-1 and 8-2 in his junior and senior seasons.

At William & Mary, Sumner was the Tribe’s quarterback and defensive back from 1951-54. He made both the Associated Press and United Press International All-state teams in 1953.

Thomas said that Sumner did everything a player could do on offense while at W&M – he ran, passed, punted, kicked off and returned kickoffs and punts.

As a freshman, Sumner’s 89-yard kickoff return to start the second half led the team’s 20-12 win over Penn, which at the time was one of the leading teams in the East.

During Sumner’s years, William & Mary was very competitive with a schedule that included Wake Forest, N.C. State, Virginia Tech, Oklahoma, Penn State, West Virginia, Navy, Virginia and Duke.

According to Thomas, prior to the 1953 season, a violation of the W&M Honor Code decimated the team to only 24 players.  Despite their thin ranks, Sumner led the team to a 5-4-1 record with wins over Wake Forest, Virginia Tech, N.C. State, George Washington and Richmond and a tie with Navy.

Following his senior season in ’54, Sumner was drafted by the NFL’s Chicago Bears, coached by the great George Halas. At Chicago he played defensive back from 1955 until 1960 – earning the team’s Rookie of the Year award his first season.  All that despite the fact he broke his jaw during a preseason game, and played the entire season with it wired.

Sumner was then picked up by the Minnesota Vikings in the NFL’s expansion draft.

In all, Sumner played 73 regular season pro football games.

After retiring as a player from the Vikings, Sumner began his career as a coach being hired by Al Davis, general manager and head coach of the NFL’s Oakland Raiders.  Sumner was Davis’ assistant coach and defensive coordinator.

The Raiders turned a worst-ever 1-13 record in 1962 into a 10-4 record in 1963 with Davis and Sumner at the helm.

Sumner later returned to the Raiders in 1979 for a five-year stint as defensive coordinator for head coach Tom Flores and his successor, Mike Shanahan.

The list of players Sumner coached in the Raiders’ defense include Hall of Famers cornerback Willie Brown, linebacker Ted Hendricks, cornerback Mike Haynes, defensive end / defensive tackle Howie Long and defensive back Ronnie Lott.

Raiders management issued this statement following Sumner’s death: “The Raiders are deeply saddened by the news of Charlie Sumner’s passing.  Charlie was an esteemed part of the Raider family and was instrumental in some of the Silver and Black’s greatest triumphs. Our deepest sympathies are with Charlie’s family at this time.”

In 1969 Sumner was hired by Chuck Noll as the new defensive coordinator of the Pittsburgh Steelers. The Steelers had suffered through five straight losing seasons before going 11-3 in 1972.  During the turnaround, Sumner coached Hall of Fame Steelers including cornerback Mel Blount, defensive tackle Joe Greene and linebacker Jam Ham.

In 1973 Sumner joined the New England Patriots as defensive coordinator for six seasons, helping the Patriots turn around a six-season losing streak.

Defensive Hall of Famers playing for Sumner in New England included cornerback Mike Haynes and line backer Nick Buoniconti.

Sumner moved over to the former United States Football League midway through the 1984 season as head coach and general manager of the Oakland Invaders.  A year later the Invaders won the title of the now defunct league.  His record while with the Invaders was 13-4-1.

He returned to the Raiders from 1986-89 and finished out his career as an assistant with the Sacramento Surge of the old World Football League.

“Charlie Sumner wore the Raiders’ famed colors of silver and black with pride and with poise,” said Davis, himself an NFL Hall of Fame coach and team owner. “He was a star among stars. His dedication, devotion and loyalty still reap the rewards of victory.”

“It is my humble opinion that without Charlie on board as defensive coordinator, neither of those two championships (Super Bowl wins in 1980 over Philadelphia and 1983 over Washington) would have been accomplished,” said Long. “When you speak the name of Charlie Sumner to anyone who played with him or for him, people speak of him with respect and that speaks volumes in the NFL.”

Following his retirement, Sumner had other offers to return to coaching, but instead went on a vacation to Hawaii “and never came back,” according to family members.

While in Hawaii, Sumner became an avid golfer.

Sumner’s accomplishments on the gridiron for William & Mary earned him a place in the Tribe’s Football Hall of Fame in 1972.

On April 28, 2007 – almost exactly eight years ago – Thomas and other Sumner supporters succeeded in seeing the old Dublin Duke inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame in Portsmouth.

It was a big year for Pulaski County sports greats, with Sumner’s induction coming at the same time as that of Gary Clark – the former Pulaski County Cougar, James Madison University Duke and Washington Redskins star receiver.

Other inductees into the state hall of fame that year included Gene Corrigan (former Virginia and Notre Dame Athletic Director and ACC Commissioner), John McKenna (former VMI football coach), Ricky Rudd (NASCAR driver), Bryant Stith (former Virginia great and 10-year veteran of the NBA) and Jim Colston (radio sports announcer).

Sumner was preceded in death by his parents, Earl and Ivy Vickers Sumner and a sister, Sarah Sumner Wirt.  He leaves behind his partner, June Montgomery; two sons, Colin and Terry; one granddaughter and many cousins.

In keeping with his wishes, Sumner was cremated and his ashes scattered over the Pacific Ocean around Maui.

Information for this article was provided by Bill Thomas and Sharon Hardy.

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Board proclaims National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week in county

Staff Report

The Board of Supervisors voted Monday night to proclaim April 12-18 as National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week in Pulaski County. The proclamation is in honor of the men and women whose diligence and professionalism have helped keep the county and its citizens safe during the past year.

The proclamation states that “emergencies can occur at any time that require police, fire or emergency medical services.

“When an emergency occurs the prompt response of police officers, firefighters and paramedics is critical to the protection of life and preservation of property;

“The safety of our police officers and firefighters is dependent upon the quality and accuracy of information obtained from citizens who telephone the Pulaski County Joint 9-1-1 Communications Center.

“Public Safety Telecommunicators are the first and most critical contact our citizens have with emergency services.

“Public Safety Telecommunicators are the single vital link for our police officers and firefighters by monitoring their activities by radio, providing them information and insuring their safety.

“Public Safety Telecommunicators of the Pulaski County Joint 9-1-1 Communications Center have contributed substantially to the apprehension of criminals, suppression of fires and treatment of patients.

“Each Public Safety Telecommunicator has exhibited compassion, understanding and professionalism during the performance of their job in the past year,” the resolution states.

Jordan’s Chapel UMC to conduct summer backpack program

Staff Report

While there are many week day food programs at schools and other sites in Pulaski County during the summer, there are no programs that provide food on weekends.

Jordan’s Chapel United Methodist Church is working to change that.

According to Holly King, Coordinator of the Feed My Lambs Backpack program, Jordan’s Chapel will conduct the county’s first summer backpack program beginning in June.

Beginning with the first distribution on Thursday, June 4 and Friday, June 5 food will be available to children who attend either Pulaski Elementary or Critzer Elementary and their siblings who are pre-registered for the summer program.

King says the summer backpack program will distribute food in plastic bags so there will be no worry to return bags each week.

The bags can be picked up either of two days:

-Thursdays from 5-6 p.m. at Jordan’s Chapel UMC, 5095 Alum Spring Road, Pulaski or

-Fridays from 5-6 p.m. at the Pulaski Social Services office on Commerce Street in Pulaski, inside in the conference room off the lobby.

Children must be signed up to participate in this program by Friday, May 22.  Completed signup forms should be returned to the guidance counselor at either school, with forms being forwarded to Jordan’s Chapel. Those forms are being sent home in the homework folder of all students already participating in the backpack program.

Currently some 150 students at Critzer participate in the program, while another 65 participate at Pulaski Elementary.

Program space is limited so King urges that signup forms be returned ASAP!

Those with questions about the program can contact the schools’ guidance counselors: Ruth Vordo at Pulaski Elementary and Connie Armentrout at Critzer.

For more information on how the community can help with this program, contact Jordan’s Chapel United Methodist Church at 980-1317.

web Tucks Collision

 

Relay for Life Survivor & Caregiver Banquet set

The Pulaski County Relay for Life Committee wishes to announce its annual Survivor & Caregiver Banquet.

This year’s event will held Sunday, April 26 at the Dublin United Methodist Church from 2 to 4 p.m.

There will be food, entertainment and an evening that celebrates cancer survivors and caregivers.

All survivors and caregivers are welcome to attend.

All cancer survivors and caregivers as well as the general public are also invited to attend the 2015 Pulaski County Relay for Life event on Saturday, June 27.

This year’s relay will be held at the Pulaski County High School football field from 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 27 to 2 a.m. on Sunday, June 28.

This year’s theme is, “Team-N-Up For A Cure.”

The event will feature bands, food, games and lots of other fun the entire day for the whole family, including a special camp site for honored guests – all cancer survivors and caregivers.

Come out and help raise funds for the American Cancer Society to fight the fight against cancer.

April is Pulaski County clean up month

From Pulaski County Clean Community Council

The Pulaski County Clean Community Council (PCCCC) is asking each resident of our community to take the initiative to patrol your property bounders and glean your street / roadside and grounds for the litter that has been left behind by winters winds and snow melt.

To assist our residents the PCCC has secured from VDOT heavy duty plastic bags. These bags may be acquired by contacting Pulaski County business offices by calling 980-7710. You may place your filled bags at curb, road side, or at your regularly pick up PSA location for removal. Both VDOT and Pulaski County PSA have agreed to pick these up on regular service or patrol day for you street or road daring the month of April.

The members of the PCCCC will be out in force during the month to perform and assist, in street and highway patrols and picking up litter. Church, Civic, Community Organizations, and individuals are encouraged to join forces with the council members. Call 980-7710 for details.

Pulaski County is blessed with beautiful vistas. It is unfortunate the condition of some of the storefronts, highways, and streets do not reflect this. Litter is a problem in our community. Litter is a prime factor decreasing; property values, community growth, and a challenge to health and safety of our citizens and visitors. Thousands of man hours are spent each year in managing litter and discharged trash on our community byways, roads, and streets. Thousands of tax payer dollars are spent by county staff policing litter from our roads. Help deter this expense by not littering, secure loads being transported, and report littering/dumping to the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office at 980-7800.

 

The PCCCC would like to thank VDOT coordinator Gail Thompson, Ronnie Nichols PC PSA, and Kim Wright of Pulaski County in the planning and support of this April event.

Please pick up some bags and pick up your property. Encourage your family, neighbors, and fellow citizens to help. As a reminder, in your travels, if you see an orange bag at the side of the road, please be cautious! Be on the lookout for cleanup crews on your street.

Obituary for John Wilburn Goad

John Wilburn Goad, age 67 of Pulaski, died Thursday, April 16, 2015 at his residence.  He was born on January 15, 1948 in Pulaski, and was the son of the late Ida Roseberry Goad and James Cecil Goad.  John was a proud and long-time United Methodist, and was a retired deputy Sheriff for the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office.  He is survived by his wife; Vicky King Goad of Pulaski:  one son;  John (Jay) Goad and his wife Danielle of Pulaski:  two daughters;  Angela Suzanne Goad of Pulaski, and Mary Elizabeth Goad Ratliff and her husband Phillip of Reston:  two brothers;  James Walter Goad of Radford, and Roger Lee Goad and his wife Juanita of Stafford:  two sisters;  Betty Anderson and her husband Jerry of Goldsboro, NC and Brenda Goad of Pulaski.  He is also survived by a granddaughter, Morgan Akers and her husband Ethan of Pulaski, and one great-grandson Eli Cole Akers along with many nieces, nephews, and cousins.  A memorial service will be held Monday, April 20, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church with the Rev. Hugh Kilgore officiating.  Interment will be private.  The family will receive friends Sunday evening at Seagle Funeral Home from 6 until 8 p.m.  In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be made in the form of donations to “Feed My Lambs” backpack program P.O. Box 1626 Pulaski, VA 24301.  Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.seaglefuneralhome.com  Arrangements by Seagle Funeral Home, Pulaski.  540-980-1700

 

Obituary for Mary Edith Matherly

Mary Edith Matherly, age 100 formerly of Pulaski passed away Monday, April 13, 2015 at the

Westmoreland Rehab & Nursing Center, Colonial Beach, Virginia.

Born May 30, 1914 in Shell Creek, TN she was the daughter of the late Chester Arthur Shell & Hattie Winters Shell.

Her husband; Charles Warren Matherly (1985), Daughter, Mary Evelyn Propst, son-in-law, William Propst, grandson, Johnny Propst, 3 sisters and 2 brothers also preceded her in death.

She is survived by her

Son & Daughter-in-law

Roger & Bonnie Matherly- Colonial Beach, VA

Grandchildren

David Keith Matherly (Lori) – Nashville, TN

Christopher Allen Matherly (Annabelle) – Wake Forrest, NC

Mary Elaine Phillips (Bryson) – Alpharetta, GA

Martha Holley (Robert) – Waynesboro, Miss

Melanie Rupe (Brian) – Pulaski, VA

9 Great Grandchildren

Sisters

Iris Ludwig (Carl) – Richmond, VA

Kathleen Anderson – Hanover, VA

Martha Alvis – Richmond, VA

Dear Friend

Elizabeth Queen – Pulaski, VA

Many  nieces and nephews

Funeral services will be held 2:00 PM – Friday, April 17, 2015 at the Memorial Baptist Church, Pulaski. Interment will follow at the Highland Memory Gardens, Dublin.

The family will receive friends Friday from 1:00 PM until service time at the church.

In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to Memorial Baptist Church, 995 Peppers Ferry RD. Pulaski, VA 24301; Westmoreland Rehabilitation and Health Care,2400 McKinney Blvd., Colonial Beach, VA 22443; or Westmoreland  Independent Baptist Church, 17921 Ridge Road, Colonial Beach, VA 22443.

To send the family your online condolences, visit www.bowerfuneralhome.com

Bower Funeral Home, Pulaski is handling the arrangements for the Matherly family. 540-980-6160.

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Percy Sledge, who sang ‘When A Man Loves a Woman,’ dies

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Percy Sledge, who soared from part-time singer and hospital orderly to lasting fame with his aching, forlorn performance on the classic “When a Man Loves a Woman,” died Tuesday in Louisiana. He was 74.

Dr. William “Beau” Clark, coroner for East Baton Rouge Parish, confirmed to The Associated Press that Sledge died early Tuesday morning, about an hour after midnight of natural causes in hospice care.

A No. 1 hit in 1966, “When a Man Loves a Woman” was Sledge’s debut single, an almost unbearably heartfelt ballad with a resonance he never approached again. Few singers could have. Its mood set by a mournful organ and dirge-like tempo, “When a Man Loves a Woman” was for many the definitive soul ballad, a testament of blinding, all-consuming love haunted by fear and graced by overwhelming emotion.

“When a Man Loves a Woman” was a personal triumph for Sledge, who seemed on the verge of sobbing throughout the production, and a breakthrough for Southern soul. It was the first No. 1 hit from Alabama’s burgeoning Muscle Shoals music scene, where Aretha Franklin and the Rolling Stones among others would record, and the first gold record for Atlantic Records.

Atlantic Records executive Jerry Wexler later called the song “a transcendent moment” and “a holy love hymn.” Sledge’s hit became a standard that sustained his long touring career in the U.S., Europe and South Africa, when he averaged 100 performances a year, and led to his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2005. It was a favorite at weddings — Sledge himself did the honors at a ceremony for musician and actor Steve Van Zandt — and often turned up in movies, including “The Big Chill,” ”The Crying Game” and a 1994 Meg Ryan drama named for the song’s title.

“When a Man Loves a Woman” was re-released after being featured in Oliver Stone’s Vietnam War film “Platoon” in 1987 and reached No. 2 in Britain. Michael Bolton topped the charts in the 1990s with a cover version and Rolling Stone magazine later ranked it No. 53 on its list of the greatest songs of all time.

Recognizable by his wide, gap-toothed smile, Sledge had a handful of other hits between 1966 and 1968, including “Warm and Tender Love,” ”It Tears Me Up,” ”Out of Left Field” and “Take Time to Know Her.” He returned to the charts in 1974 with “I’ll Be Your Everything.”

Before he became famous, Sledge worked in the cotton fields around his hometown of Leighton in northwest Alabama and took a job in a hospital in nearby Sheffield. He also spent weekends playing with a rhythm-and-blues band called the Esquires. A patient at the hospital heard him singing while working and recommended him to record producer Quin Ivy.

In the 2013 documentary “Muscle Shoals,” Sledge recalled recording the song: “When I came into the studio, I was shaking like a leaf. I was scared.” He added that it was the “same melody that I sang when I was out in the fields. I just wailed out in the woods and let the echo come back to me.”

The composition of the song has long been a mystery. Some thought that Sledge wrote it himself. Sledge said he was inspired by a girlfriend who left him for a modeling career after he was laid off from a construction job in 1965, but he gave the songwriting credits to two Esquires bandmates, bassist Calvin Lewis and organist Andrew Wright, who helped him with the song.

While identified with the Muscle Shoals music scene, Sledge spent most of his career living in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He was inducted in the Alabama Music Hall of Fame in 1993 and the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame in 2007.

In April 1994, Sledge pleaded guilty in federal court to tax evasion involving income from concerts in the late 1980s. He was sentenced to six months in a halfway house, given five years of probation, and ordered to pay $96,000 in back taxes and fines. When he pleaded guilty, he told the judge, “I knew I owed more.”

April is Cleanup Month in Pulaski County

Aril 2015 PCCCCFrom Pulaski County Clean Community Council

The Pulaski COUNTY Clean Community Council (PCCCC) is asking each resident of our community to take the initiative to patrol your property bounders and glean your street / roadside and grounds for the litter that has been left behind by winters winds and snow melt.

To assist our residents the PCCC has secured from VDOT heavy duty plastic bags. These bags may be acquired by contacting Pulaski County business offices by calling 980-7710. You may place your filled bags at curb, road side, or at your regularly pick up PSA location for removal . Both VDOT and Pulaski County PSA have agreed to pick these up on regular service or patrol day for you street or road daring the month of April.

The members of the PCCCC will be out in force during the month to perform and assist, in street and highway patrols and picking up litter. Church, Civic, Community Organizations, and individuals are encouraged to join forces with the council members. Call 980-7710 for details.

 

Pulaski county is blessed with beautiful vistas. It is unfortunate the condition of some of the storefronts, highways, and streets do not reflect this . Litter is a problem in our community. Litter is a prime factor decreasing; property values, community growth, and a challenge to health and safety of our citizens and visitors. Thousands of man hours are spent each year in managing litter and discharged trash on our community byways, roads, and streets . Thousands of tax payer dollars are spent by county staff policing litter from our roads. Help deter this expense by not littering , secure loads being transported , and report littering/dumping to the Pulaski County Sheriffs Department at 980-7800.

The PCCCC would like to thank VDOT coordinator Gail Thompson, Ronnie Nichols PC PSA, and Kim Wright of Pulaski County in the planning and support of this April event.

Please pick up some bags and pick up your property. Encourage your family, neighbors , and fellow citizens to help. As a reminder , in your travels, if you see an orange bag at the side of the road, please be cautious ! Be on the look out for clean up crews on your street.

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