Abingdon man dies in single vehicle crash in Draper

By Capt. Jeff Saunders
Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office
On Thursday, Aug. 28 at approximately 8:30 p.m. the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office responded with Draper Fire and REMSI EMS to the 2700 block of Wysor Rd. ( Rt-100) in Draper for a single vehicle crash.
Deputies found a 1995 Chevrolet pickup truck pulling a utility trailer was traveling North on Wysor Rd. and ran off of the right side of the road, over corrected and went across the road, hit an embankment and over turned, ejecting the driver.
The driver was identified as 65 year old John Ramsey Flournoy, Jr. of Abingdon. Flournoy was not wearing a seatbelt and died at the scene.
Accident is still under investigation by Deputy C.A. Moore.

West Main Development Company, LLC Unveils plans for major re-development project in Pulaski

Pulaski – The Virginia Secretary of Commerce and Trade Maurice Jones visited today to participate in the announcement of a major redevelopment project in Downtown Pulaski that will renovate some existing buildings, attract new residents, businesses, and create jobs. The total investment will be more than $1.5 million.

West Main Development, LLC has purchased or has under contract four buildings in the West Main corridor of the Town of Pulaski, Virginia. The properties are located at 29 West Main Street, 85-87-89 West Main Street, 69 West Main Street, and 94 West Main Street. In addition, investors have purchased or have contracts on at least ten residential properties in Pulaski. As previously announced, a private investor involved with West Main Development (Ms. Cathy Stripling) has also purchased “132 Guesthouse” at 132 3rd St NW that will serve as a “guesthouse” for tourists.

“I applaud Pulaski and everyone involved in this project for their efforts to revitalize downtown,” said Secretary Jones. “Downtown redevelopment is at the heart of community development, which is vital to the health of our neighborhoods.”

Tyler Clontz, a 2008 Pulaski County High School graduate, who is a member of West Main Development noted that when he graduated from high school, he had few memories of coming downtown. “Like most people, the broad streets of downtown and the turn of the century facades of these buildings, probably made me think about the town that once was,” Clontz said.

“I now see a boulevard once again lined with bustling shoppers and people who live downtown. I am proud to be a part of this effort.”

Clontz thanked the project’s partners, including the Town of Pulaski, the County of Pulaski, the Pulaski County IDA, and several other public and private partners.

Stripling, a Blacksburg native and the project leader noted that “When complete, we plan to have 10 apartments and five commercial storefronts. We estimate that, when we are finished, there will be over 9,000 square feet of apartment space and over 6,500 square feet of commercial storefront space added to the downtown marketplace,” she said.

“West Main Development’s total investment will exceed 1 million dollars.” Stripling noted. The total project will rehabilitate over 15,000 sq. ft. of downtown property.

The Town of Pulaski and Pulaski County have provided loan funds for so-called “soft-costs” (architectural and engineering drawings, e.g.) to assist West Main Development on the project.

The Town and County have been in discussions with Citizens Telephone Cooperative based in Floyd about creating fiber optic connections to insure the highest speed internet connections for the developments.

Construction work will begin very soon on 85/87/89 W. Main (the former Farmer Building) that will be privately financed. The entire project, however, has been procured and bid.

The developers will seek permanent financing from the Virginia Housing Development Authority and hope to obtain certificates of occupancy by the end of calendar year 2015. The project will seek to qualify for Historic Tax Credits and Enterprise Zone funds.

“We are building on the restoration efforts already underway and adding momentum to the ongoing downtown renaissance,” said Clontz.

10 Things to Know for Thursday

The Associated Press

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Thursday:

1. FRESH HOPE FOR WORLD’S ABUSED WOMEN

A decision by a U.S. government board establishes for the first time that domestic violence victims can qualify for asylum in America.

2. MOTHER PLEADS FOR RELEASE OF CAPTURED US JOURNALIST

In a video, she appeals to the Islamic State militants to show mercy to 31-year-old Steven Sotloff, who was last seen a year ago in Syria.

3. WHY MANY PEOPLE WITH PRE-EXISTING CONDITIONS STILL DON’T HAVE MEDICAL INSURANCE

Consumer advocates warn that insurance companies are still using wiggle room to discourage the sickest — and costliest — patients from enrolling in “Obamacare.”

4. UKRAINE SEPARATISTS LAUNCH BOLD OFFENSIVE

The attack along a new southeastern front raises the prospect that the rebels are seeking to create a land link between Russia and Crimea.

5. HOW WEAPONS LESSON WENT TRAGICALLY WRONG

A 9-year-old girl being taught how to fire an Uzi at an Arizona range fatally shoots her instructor in the head when the weapon recoils.

6. CASH KEEPS FLOWING FROM ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE

The viral fundraising campaign for Lou Gehrig’s Disease is approaching a stunning $100 million. And the money keeps pouring in.

7. REALITY SHOW BECOMES ALL TOO REAL

A crew member with the TV show “Cops” dies when gunfire breaks out as police in Omaha, Neb., disrupt a robbery.

8. WHO’S RIDING HUGE WAVES PUSHED ASHORE BY PACIFIC HURRICANE

Intrepid surfers and body-boarders flock to favored spots along the Southern California coast to take advantage of the storm-spawned surf.

9. BACK-TO-SCHOOL BLUES HIT DOGS, TOO

When their young owners return to school, many pets experience separation anxiety, experts say.

10. USC FOOTBALL PLAYER, HAILED AS HERO, ADMITS TO LYING ABOUT HOW HE BADLY INJURED BOTH ANKLES

Josh Shaw, a team captain, retracts his story about jumping off a balcony to save his drowning nephew. How Shaw actually was injured remains a mystery.

Obituary for Freda Joy Warf Edmonds

Freda Joy Warf Edmonds, age 80 of Pulaski passed away Tuesday, August 26, 2014 at her home. Born February 27, 1934 in Wilco West Virginia she was the daughter of the late John Clyde Warf & Minnie Catherine Cox Warf. Her husband – Everett Lee Edmonds, Sr., son – Ricky Edmonds and number of brothers and sisters also preceded her in death.

She is survived by her

Two Daughters and Sons-in-law

Sandy & Paul Turpin – Pulaski

Mary Catherine & Tommy VonGarlem – Hughesville, MD

Son- Gary Wayne Edmonds – Pulaski

Grandchildren

Jacob Edmonds,          Taylor Edmonds, &     Megan Turpin Riggs.

Great Grandchildren

Tanner & Cody Edmonds, Hayden Riggs and on the way, Harper Kate Riggs

Brothers

Bobby Warf & wife, Shirley Warf – Dublin

John Warf, Jr. – Draper

Eddie Warf & wife, Helen Warf – Myrtle Beach, SC

Sisters-

Gladys Ingram-Pulaski

Patsy Hall- Pulaski

Funeral services will be held at 12:00 Noon – Saturday, August 30, 2014 at the Pulaski Church of God (Refreshing Center) on Bobwhite Blvd., – Pulaski with Pastor Jerry Collins officiating.

Interment will follow at the Draper Valley Pentecostal Holiness Church Cemetery, Wythe Co.

The family will receive friends from 10:30 AM until service time Saturday at the Church.

To send the family your online condolences visit, www.bowerfuneralhome.com

Bower Funeral Chapel, Pulaski is handling the arrangements for the Family.

Military: Jet in Virginia crash based in Mass.

DEERFIELD, Va. (AP) — An Air Force jet based in Massachusetts crashed in the mountains of western Virginia on Wednesday, shaking the ground and frightening residents, and officials said the pilot’s status was unknown.

No injuries were reported on the ground, but authorities were still trying to reach the crash site — located through its heavy smoke coming from a mountainside — on Wednesday.

The pilot of the single-seat aircraft was with the 104th Fighter Wing of the Massachusetts Air National Guard in Westfield, spokesman Maj. Matthew Mutti said.

The jet was on a standard training exercise with no munition onboard, Mutti said. He didn’t say where it was headed or release the pilot’s name.

Military officials in Washington told local authorities in Augusta County that they had lost communication with a jet, according to Augusta County dispatcher Becky Coynter. She said witnesses reported an explosion-like noise just before 9 a.m.

“It’s the loudest noise I’ve ever heard,” 63-year-old Rebecca Shinaberry, who lives on a farm about two miles away, told The Associated Press. “(It) just shook the ground and from my house we could just see a big plume of smoke.”

Deerfield is about 135 miles northwest of Richmond.

McAuliffe orders cuts to Virginia state agencies

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe is ordering state agency heads to come up with across-the-board budget cuts for the next two years in order to cope with a more than $880 million budget shortfall.

McAuliffe’s chief of staff, Paul Reagan, sent a memo to agency chiefs on Friday ordering them to come up with suggestions on how to cut 5 percent from their budgets this fiscal year and 7 percent next year.

“Please ensure that your recommendations are both practical and consistent with preserving the known priorities or directives of the governor as much as possible,” Reagan said in the memo. “This is a time of great economic uncertainty and your leadership will make a difference as we face these challenges.”

He also emphasized the need to find recurring cuts, instead of one-time savings. And Reagan told agency bosses not to make budget cut suggestions that “simply pass on additional costs to another state agency.”

Reagan said suggested budget plans could include increasing fees for outside parties.

The across-the-board cuts did not apply to higher education institutions, which would be the focus of targeted reductions later, Reagan said.

The agency heads were directed to submit their proposed budget plans to the governor’s office by Sept. 19.

McAuliffe announced the $880 million budget hole earlier this month and said that state officials will have to make “a series of hard decisions that will test our ability to protect our core priorities and balance our budget.”

Officials said $346 million will have to be found in fiscal year 2015 and $536 million will be needed in fiscal year 2016.

AAA projects increase in Labor Day travel in Va.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — More Virginians are expected to travel this Labor Day weekend, reaching a new post-recession high for the state.

AAA Mid-Atlantic says that the number of people taking a trip at least 50 miles away from home is anticipated to increase slightly this year.

That’s more than 964,300 Virginians traveling during the Thursday through Monday holiday weekend.

The majority of Virginians are expected to travel by car and gas prices have brought a welcome relief to motorists. Prices in Virginia are down about 4 percent per gallon compared with the same time last year.

Motorists are being reminded to buckle up and drive sober and distraction-free while traveling for the upcoming holiday.

10 Things to Know for Today

The Associated Press

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. TOUGH ISSUES REMAIN FOLLOWING GAZA TRUCE DEAL

Israel and Hamas agree to an open-ended cease-fire after seven weeks of fighting, but barriers to lasting peace persist — such as Palestinian appeals for the end of a Gaza blockade.

2. FREED AMERICAN JOURNALIST BACK HOME

Peter Theo Curtis who was held by a Syrian extremist group of nearly two years is reunited with his family in Boston.

3. EX-FLA. GOV. CRIST CONTINUES POLITICAL COMEBACK

Democratic voters select him as their nominee to challenge Republican Gov. Rick Scott in the Sunshine State.

4. WHY CORPORATE INVERSIONS ARE RISING

More and more U.S. companies are merging with foreign ones to avoid American taxation.

5. WHO GIVES ‘POSITIVE ASSESSMENT’ OF UKRAINE SUMMIT

Russian President Putin suggested he was encouraged following talks for a peace plan in Eastern Ukraine, while Ukraine President Petro Poroshenko also voiced support.

6. TWITCH SALE SHOWS VIDEO GAMES HAVE COME OF AGE

Amazon’s commitment to buy the online gaming community for $1 billion highlights the value of revenue streams coming from gamers.

7. AFGHANISTAN’S FINANCES SLOW DOWN AHEAD OF TROOP WITHDRAWAL

A rise in violent attacks combined with fears over the country’s political future is hurting its lopsided economy.

8. WHERE FOOD SHORTAGE MEANS BULGING WAISTLINES

Most Venezuelans can’t find enough to eat so they are binging on empty calories.

9. FIFA, CANADA FACE HEAT OVER WOMEN’S WORLD CUP

Athletes and fans including Tom Hanks are criticizing plans to hold the 2015 soccer tournament on artificial turf and not grass.

10. NEW FALL TV SHOWS WORTHY OF FIRST-NIGHT LOOK

FOX’s “Red Band Society” and ABC’s “Black-ish” are among the fresh autumn crop of programs.

Pulaski Police, PCPC taking back unwanted prescription drugs Sept. 27 at Food City

From Officer Megan Jennings

Pulaski Police Dept.

On September 27 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Pulaski Police Department, Pulaski Community Partners Coalition (PCPC), and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will give the public its ninth opportunity in four years to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs.  Bring your pills for disposal to Food City in the town of Pulaski.  (The DEA cannot accept liquids or needles or sharps, only pills or patches.)  The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

Last April, Americans turned in 390 tons (over 780,000 pounds) of prescription drugs at nearly 6,100 sites operated by the DEA and more than 4,400 of its state and local law enforcement partners.  When those results are combined with what was collected in its eight previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners have taken in over 4.1 million pounds—more than 2,100 tons—of pills.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue.  Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs.  Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines—flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash—both pose potential safety and health hazards.

DEA is in the process of approving new regulations that implement the Safe and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which amends the Controlled Substances Act to allow an “ultimate user” (that is, a patient or their family member or pet owner) of controlled substance medications to dispose of them by delivering them to entities authorized by the Attorney General to accept them.  The Act also allows the Attorney General to authorize long term care facilities to dispose of their residents’ controlled substances in certain instances.

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